World Library  


Project Gutenberg Consortia Center


Project Gutenberg is the first and largest single collection of free electronic books, or eBooks. Michael Hart, founder of Project Gutenberg, invented eBooks in 1971 and continues to inspire the creation of eBooks and related technologies today.

 
  • Cover Image

The Unexpurgated Case against Woman Suffrage

By: Almroth E. Wright

Preface: It has come to be believed that everything that has a bearing upon the concession of the suffrage to woman has already been brought forward. In reality, however, the influence of women has caused man to leave unsaid many things which he ought to have said. Especially in two respects has woman restricted the discussion.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Unexpurgated Case against Woman Suffrage

By: Almroth E. Wright

Preface: It has come to be believed that everything that has a bearing upon the concession of the suffrage to woman has already been brought forward. In reality, however, the influence of women has caused man to leave unsaid many things which he ought to have said. Especially in two respects has woman restricted the discussion.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Venus and Adonis

By: William Shakespeare

VENUS AND ADONIS EVEN as the sun with purple-color?d face Had ta?en his last leave of the weeping morn, Rose-cheek?d Adonis tried him to the chase; Hunting he lov?d, but love he laugh?d to scorn; 4 Sick-thoughted Venus makes amain unto him, and like a bold-fac?d suitor ?gins to woo him.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Wes Sex Poems and Other Verses

By: Thomas Hardy

Preface: Of the miscellaneous collection of verse that follows, only four pieces have been published, though many were written long ago, and other partly written. In some few cases the verses were turned into prose and printed as such, it having been unanticipated at that time that they might see the light.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Great War Syndicate

By: Frank R. Stockton

THE GREAT WAR SYNDICATE. In the spring of a certain year, not far from the close of the nineteenth century, when the political relations between the United States and Great Britain became so strained that careful observers on both sides of the Atlantic were forced to the belief that a serious break in these relations might be looked for at any time, the fishing schooner Eliza Drum sailed from a port in Maine for the banks of Newfoundland.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Where the Blue Begins

By: Christopher Morley

Gissing lived alone (except for his Japanese butler) in a little house in the country, in that woodland suburb region called the Canine Estates. He lived comfortably and thoughtfully, as bachelors often does. He came of a respectable family, who had always conducted themselves calmly and without too much argument. They had bequeathed him just enough income to live on cheerfully, without display but without having to do addition and subtraction at the end of the month and...

Read More
  • Cover Image

While the Billy Boils

By: Henry Lawson

AN OLD MATE OF YOUR FATHER?S. You remember when we hurried home from the old bush school how we were sometimes startled by a bearded apparition, who smiled kindly down on us, and whom our mother introduced, as we raked off our hats, as ?An old mate of your father?s on the diggings, Johnny.? And he would pat our heads and say we were fine boys, or girls?as the case may have been?and that we had our father?s nose but our mother?s eyes, or the other way about; and say that ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Watchers of the Sky

By: Alfred Noyes

Prefatory Note: This volume, while it is complete in itself, is also the first of a trilogy, the scope of which is suggested in the prologue. The story of scientific discovery has its own epic unity?a unity of purpose and endeavor?the single torch passing from hand to hand through the centuries; and the great moments of science when, after long labor, the pioneers saw their accumulated facts falling into a significant order?sometimes in the form of a law that revolutioni...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Witch of Atlas

By: Percy Bysshe Shelley

My dear Mary, are you critic-bitten (For vipers kill, though dead) by some review, That you condemn these verses I have written, Because they tell no story, false or true? What, though no mice are caught by a young kitten, 5 May it not leap and play as grown cats do, Till its claws come? Prithee, for this one time, Content thee with a visionary rhyme.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Wilhelm Tell

By: Friedrich Schiller

Introductory Note: Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller was born at Marbach, Wurtemberg, Germany, November 10, 1759. His father had served both as surgeon and soldier in the War of the Austrian Succession, and at the time of the poet?s birth held an appointment under the Duke of Wurtemberg. Friedrich?s education was begun with a view to holy orders, but this idea was given up when he was placed in a military academy established by the Duke.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Wilhelm Tell

By: Friedrich Schiller
Read More
  • Cover Image

White Fang

By: Jack London

THE TRAIL OF THE MEAT: Dark spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean towards each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter mor...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Within the Tides

By: Joseph Conrad

Chapter I. In the private editorial office of the principal newspaper in a great colonial city two men were talking. They were both young. The stouter of the two, fair, and with more of an urban look about him, was the editor and part-owner of the important newspaper.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Without a Home

By: E. P. Roe

Preface: Just ten years ago I took my first hesitating and dubious steps toward authorship. My reception on the part of the public has been so much kinder than I expected, and the audience that has listened to my stories with each successive autumn has been so steadfast and loyal, that I can scarcely be blamed for entertaining a warm and growing regard for these unseen, unknown friends. Toward indifferent strangers we maintain a natural reticence, but as acquaintance rip...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Water of Life and Other Sermons

By: Charles Kingsley

And the Spirit and the Bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely. This text is its own witness. It needs no man to testify to its origin. Its own words show it to be inspired and divine.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The White Moll

By: Frank L. Packard

NIGHT IN THE UNDERWORLD. It was like some shadowy pantomime. The dark mouth of an alleyway thrown into murky relief by the rays of a distant street lamp the swift, forward leap of a skulking figure, a girl?s form swaying and struggling in the man?s embrace. Then, a pantomime no longer, there came a half threatening, half triumphant oath; and then the girl?s voice, quiet, strangely contained, almost imperious.

Read More
  • Cover Image

What the Animals Do and Say

By: Eliza Lee Follen

WHAT THE ANIMALS DO AND SAY. ?Could you not tell us a traveler?s story of some strange people that we have never heard of before?? said Harry to his mother, the next evening. After a moment or two of thought, Mis. Chilton said, ?Yes, I will tell you about a people who are great travelers. They take journeys every year of their lives. They dislike cold weather so much that they go always before winter, so as to find a warmer climate.? ?They usually meet together, fathers,...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Water-Babies

By: Charles Kingsley

Chapter I. ?I heard a thousand blended notes, While in a grove I sate reclined; In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind. ?To her fair works did Nature link The human soul that through me ran; And much it grieved my heart to think, What man has made of man.?

Read More
  • Cover Image

White Slaves

By: Louis A. Banks

TO THE MERCY AND HELP DEPARTMENT OF THE EPWORTH LEAGUE. Mr. Edison tells us that ninety per cent of the energy that there is in coal is lost in the present method of converting it into a usable force. May I, without being considered a croaker, say that almost the same amount of spiritual power goes to waste in our average church life? One is startled at times as he notes the manifestations of fervor and warmth in the devotional meetings of the present day, and the meager...

Read More
  • Cover Image

When the Sleeper Wakes

By: Herbert George Wells

INSOMNIA. One afternoon, at low water, Mr. Isbister, a young artist lodging at Boscastle, walked from that place to the picturesque cove of Pentargen, desiring to examine the caves there. Halfway down the precipitous path to the Pentargen beach he came suddenly upon a man sitting in an attitude of profound distress beneath a projecting mass of rock. The hands of this man hung limply over his knees, his eyes were red and staring before him, and his face was wet with tears.

Read More
 
539
|
540
|
541
|
542
|
543
Records: 10801 - 10820 of 10,918 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from School eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.