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Bio:
Ulukau: In the same way that unexplained supernatural interpretive powers can be divinely given to a person, so knowledge and understanding can come to the person who makes the effort to read the language and words of this electronic library.

Please visit http://ulukau.org for more information.

General Information:
The purpose of Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, is to make these resources available for the use, teaching, and revitalization of the Hawaiian language and for a broader and deeper understanding of Hawaiʻi.

Supporting Organizations

Ulukau was founded by Hale Kuamoʻo and is co-sponsored by Hale Kuamoʻo, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo and the Native Hawaiian Library, ALU LIKE, Inc.

Founding financial support was provided by the Administration for Native Americans. Continuing support is provided by the Department of Education.

Financial or other support was also generously given by ʻAha Pūnana Leo, the Archives of Hawaiʻi, the Association of Hawaiian Evangelical Churches, the Atherton Family Foundation, Dorothy Barrère, the Bishop Museum, Center on Disability Studies (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa), Keola Donaghy, the Dwayne & Marti Steele Fund of the Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, Edith Kanakaʻole Foundation, Editions Limited, the Frear Eleemosynary Trust, the Hawaiʻi Conference of the United Church of Christ, the Hawaiʻi Conference Foundation (UCC), Hawaiʻi State Department of Education, the Hawaiian Studies Institute (Kamehameha Schools), the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Kamehameha Publishing, the Kamehameha Schools, Kamehameha Schools Curriculum Support & Dissemination Branch, Kamehameha Schools Press, Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa), Kumu Pono Associates, Music Entertainment and Learning Center, Honolulu Community College, University of Hawaiʻi, Native Hawaiian Education Council, the Nature Conservancy, New Zealand Micrographic Services Ltd, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Mr. & Mrs. Michael O'Neill, Pacific American Foundation, Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Partners In Development Foundation, Pauahi Publications, Pili Press, the Polynesian Voyaging Society, Queen Liliʻuokalani Children's Center, Reverend Joel Hulu Mahoe Resource Center, Kekeha Solis, Stacey Leong Design, the State Council of Hawaiian Congregational Churches, the State Department of Education, the Strong Foundation, UH President Evan Dobelle's Initiative for Achieving Native Hawaiian Academic Excellence, University of Hawaiʻi Press, UH Press Journals Department, Waihona ʻĀina Corporation, and Laiana Wong.

Special acknowledgment is given to those institutions that have preserved the Legacy archival materials and shared them with the world and helped this electronic library, including Archives of Hawaiʻi, Bishop Museum Library and Archives, Hawaiian Collection (University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo), Hawaiian Collection (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa), Hawaiian Historical Society Library, Hawaiian Mission Children's Society Library, and the Kamehameha Schools Archives.

 
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Surveying the Mahele

By: Riley M. Moffat

MANY THEMES of modern Hawaiian history have their antecedents in a single historic episode—the mahele. In the 1840s, Kauikeaouli, or Kamehameha III, abandoned traditional Hawaiian land tenure in favor of the Western concept of private owner-ship of property, an event second only to the arrival of the Europeans in its impact on Hawai‘i. In the matter of a few years, Hawai‘i changed from a society in which the ali‘i ai?moku, or king, served as stew-ard of the land that be...

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He Mo’Olelo No Kapa’Ahu-Story of Kapa’Ahu

By: Emma Kauhi

Ua hanau ia o Mrs. Kauhi a hanai ia hoi ma Kapaahu, i Puna, ma ka mokupuni o Hawaii. O keia mau moolelo nei, no kona wa kamalii i Kapaahu ia, mai ka makahiki 1916 a hiki i ka makahiki 1935. Ma hope mai o ia wa, ua haalele o Mrs. Kauhi ia Kapaahu a nee o ia i Hilo e noho ai, a laila, nee hou o ia i Honolulu, a nee hou akula i Kapalakiko, ma ka aina haole. I kona manawa i hoomaha ai mai ka hana, ua hoi mai o ia i Kapaahu a kukulu ia kona hale ma laila. Ma hope mai, i ka ma...

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The Story of Maui Royalty

By: Sammy Amalu

When in the , distant yesterday of hawaii?s history, the great navigator and monarch of the hawaiian race, the prince kulani - kuil - hawaiiloa, first brought his people over the wide desert of the sea of kanaloa (the pacific ocean) from the continent of kahiki-ku to found a new domain on these islands, he named the second largest island of the hawaiian group haere tonu, which means “out of the darkness and depths of the sea.” Many centuries were to pass before the peop...

The Prince Paumakua was the last of the Hawaiin monchs, until the advent of kamehameha the Great, to held sovereignty over all of the Hawaiin islands. paumakua was the 49th lineal descendant of the great Navigator-king Hawaiiloa; he was 108th generation descendant of wakea, the God of light who was the progenitor of Hawaiin royalty.

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The Story of Hawaiian Royalty

By: Sammy Amalu

Since the untimely death of the sacred Prince William Charlcs Lunalilo, last island monarch of the Kamehameha Dynasty, about 80 years ago, there have arisen among the Hawaiians a great number of controversies involving the royal and noble genealogies, and pedigrees. In other instances, stories have been created of the most fantastic nature to distort utterly the true personalities of the Hawaiian kings and princes. For countless centuries the great House of Keawe had ...

Throughout the entire history of Hawaii, there have been only three queens who ruled in their own sovereign right. These …ere first, the fabulously beautiful Kaikilani (Heaven?s Portion), second, the powerful and imperious Keakealani (The Blinding Light of Heaven), and third, Liliuokalani, the last queen of Hawaii. The second of these, the Queen Keakealani, became the mother of the great Prince Keawe. Keakealani was an unusual woman. At a time of masculine supremacy, she...

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Stories of Life in Old Hawaii

By: Caroline Curtis

Writing in the nineteenth century, Hawaiian historian Kepelino said, "However diligently the foreigner seeks, he cannot find all. He gets a fragment here and there and goes home." That is very true. I have read what is available, but changes came so rapidly after 1778 that much of the information about the life and customs of long-ago Hawaii is lost. My greatest help has come from Mary Kawena Pukui. As a little girl in Kau, on the island of Hawaii, she lived with a wise...

Hawaiian words used in the text, other than proper names, are identified through the use of italic type. These words are usually defined in the sentence in which they are first used or in the Glossary at the back of the book or both. Most Hawaiian words, like most words in English and other languages, can have more than one meaning depending on how and where they are used. Many Hawaiian words form plurals through the use of preceding articles or by changes in the diacr...

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Spoken Hawaiian

By: Samuel H. Elbert

This volume is a result of two decades' efforts in teaching Hawaiian. The objects of the book are to present the principal conversational and grammatical patterns and the most common idioms, and to prepare the student for a final reward: the capacity to read and enjoy the rich heritage of Hawaiian traditional legends and poetry. Over the years, the reasons cited for studying Hawaiian have been diverse. Some students are merely curious or hopeful for easy credit; some ha...

The Hawaiian phonemes are listed below. English examples are approximate. The Hawaiian vowels are "pure," i.e., without glides. They are of either short or long duration. The consonants p and k have less aspiration (i.e., they are "harder") than similar English sounds in initial position. (Pairs distinguished by single phonemes follow descriptions in parentheses.) Long a (a) is longer than the other long vowels.

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Song of Eternity

By: Advanced Micro Image Systems Hawaii, Inc.

It is the purpose of this series of articles to attempt a resolution on these questions by reviewing the ethnological history of the Hawaiian peoples as contained in their ancient traditions, rituals and epic poetry. It is the purpose of these articles to present the Hawaiian royal traditions unconfounded by the elements and theology of Christianity or the insidious influence of other cultural philosophies. It is our purpose to relate what will substantially be the sam...

The Song of Eternity, never before disclosed to the public, is a series of heroic epics and liturgies. The last time that it was recited in its entirety was at the necrological ceremonies attending the funeral of the beloved Prince William Charles Lunalilo, King of Hawaii and sixth of the Dynasty of Kamehameha. Lenthy portions of it, however, have been chanted at other similar ceremonies, the most prominent of these being the coronation of David Kalakaua, and the furie...

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A Short Synopsis of the Most Essential Points of Hawaiian Grammar

By: Alexander, W. D.

As all former grammars of the Hawaiian language are out of print, at the solicitation of friends, I have revised and enlarged a brief synopsis of Hawaiian grammar, which was originally written for my pupils, and published in 1864. This little work does not pretend to be a philosophical treatise, or to be a complete account of the struct ure and peculiarities of the Hawaiian branch of the Polynesian language. But it is hoped that it may be of service to those who wish to ...

§ 1. All purely Hawaiian sound can be represented by twelve letters, of which five are voxels and seven, consonants, viz: a, e, i, o, u, h, k, l, m, n, p, w. A la sounded as in father, e as in they, i as in marine, o as in note, u as in rule, and not as in male. In a few words, as maka, make, mana, &c., the sound of a approaches that of a short u in tub. In the compounds of waho and in Oaku, it has a broad sound like that of a in fall.

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Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii

By: S. M. Kamakau

In 1961 the first edition of the English translation of Samuel Kamakau's Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii was published by Kamehameha Schools Press. Many contributed to make its publication possible. A group of Hawaiian scholars was first selected by the trustees of Bishop Museum to translate Kamakau's florid literary style into readable English. The group included Mary Kawena Pukui, Thomas G. Thrum, Lahilahi Webb, Emma Davidson Taylor, and John Wise. Mary Kawena Pukui then revie...

Many famous chiefs, mentioned in Hawaiian history, were descended from Hana-laa-nui. The ruling chiefs (noho alii) of Hawaii were of that particular lineage (mookuauhau), and with additions from those of the other islands, the genealogy of Hawaii's chiefs and their ancestors was made complete. Umi-a-Liloa [that is, Umi-son-of-Liloa] was a famous chief, and the reason for his fame was that it was he who united all of the districts of Hawaii through wars. The kingdom beca...

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Ke Ana Pohaku Ma Kahakai (The Rock Cave at the Beach)

By: Malia E. Newhouse

O The Hooulu Hou Project: Stories Told By Us kekahi papahana hou ae no Na Kamalei. Haawi ia mai la ke kala no ua papahana nei e Administration for Native Americans. O ka pahuhopu nui o ua papahana nei ka hoolako ia mai o na hana lawelawe a me na ano mea like ole nana e paipai aku i ke ao ana mai o na mea i pili loa i ka nohona Hawaii a me ka ulu maikai ana o ke keiki ola kupono (he keiki i hanai maikai ia). O wai la kakou No hea mai kakou Ua panu ia na ninau. Ua hooikaik...

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Ka Robina Gula (The Golden Robin)

By: Robina Gula

E hoomanao au i ka hua maikai,;He maha no no'u ma ke ao maluna'e;;He maha no no'u ma ke ao maluna'e.;;HUI—Mau, mau, he maha mau;No ka poe maemae ma na kula ao;;Ma na papu lai a olino mai,;Kahi ia e maha'i no ka poe maikai;;Mau, mau, he maha mau.;;2 A loa ke ala, a apuupuu no,;Akau mai na ino, a uhika po,;Epaa pono no ia olelo maikai,;E malu mai ana, a maha hou mai,;E malu mai ana, a maha hou mai.;;HUI—Mau, mau, he maha mau, &c.;;3 A popilikia, a paumako e,;Au ka waimaka,...

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Resource Units in Hawaiian Culture

By: Kamehameha Schools

Kamehameha Schools Press is pleased to present the 1992 edition of Resource Units in Hawaiian Culture by noted Hawaiian studies scholar Dr. Donald Kilolani Mitchell. This updated edition is the eighth printing of a book which, over the last three decades, has become an important reference for teachers and students of Hawaiian culture.The book offers a list of activities, study questions, and reading lists after each resource unit. Readers will find the unit symbols atop ...

Many of the praiseworthy cultural accomplishments of the Hawaiian people are examined and discussed in these units. Described here are the unusual as well as the everyday features of this remarkable civilization that flourished with vigor and efficiency in the days before the life-style was changed by the introduction of foreign ways.Centuries ago seafaring adventurers from the Marquesas and Society Islands brought with them a functioning Polynesian culture when they set...

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He Pule Hoolaa Alii (A Prayer Consecrating a Chief)

By: Hawaiian Historical Society

O ka Walewale hookumu honua ia; O ke kumu o ka lipo i lipo ai; O ke kumu o ka Po i po ai; O ka Lipolipo, o ka lipolipo; O ka lipo o ka La, o ka lipo o ka Po; Po wale ho—i.; Hanau ka po; Hanau Kumulipo i ka po he kane; Hanau Poele i ka po he wahine; Hanau ka Uku koakoa, hanau kana he akoakoa puka; Hanau ke Koe enuhe eli hoopuu honua; Hanau kana he Koe puka; Hanau ka Pea, ka peapea kana keikipuka; Hanau ka Weli, he weliweli kana keiki puka.; Hanau ka Ina ka Ina; Hanau kana...

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Ka Puke Mo'Olelo O Hon, Iosepa K. Nawahi

By: J. G. M. Sheldon

Ma waena o na lahui kanaka a pau i hookahua ia ka nohona Kalikiano kanu ia ka anoano o ka naauao, ua punia na kihi eha o ko lakou mau aina kulaiwi me ke ala anuhea a me ke onaona liula e hiki ole ai ia lakou ke poina i ka hoomanao ana ae me ke aloha onipaa i ka inoa, na hana, a me ka moolelo o ka lakou mau kalaiaina i molia i ko lakou mau ola no ka ainahanau no ka pono a me na pomaikai o ko lakou mau hoa makaainana. Ke aui a ke alawa iki aku na maka o ko kakou mau hooma...

Hui makolukolu i ka houpo ka eha e E paopao ana i ka waihona wai mapuna a ke aloha e. E u ae ana au, e mamina ae ana no ia ia. Na wai hoi e ole ka makee he iwihilo no ke kuamoo, He wohi i pehia a pulu elo me na omaka Ua Kanilehua I pawehi hooipo ia a pulu elo me ka lehua o Olaa O kau no ia e ualo aku nei—hoi mai. Eia no au, ka poli o ko aloha o Hilo Hanakahi e, He oiaio—nau oe.

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Ka Puali Kuresia (The Crusader Army)

By: Gaberiela Leona

E like me ka leo kono a na makamaka i noi mai no ka hoopuka pau pono aku i ka moolelo o kela koa kaulana o ka Puali Pale-Umauma Kila Kuresia ke Konela Gaberiela Lenoa, ka Haku Berona o ke alealii o ka Emepeia Napoliona a me ka Emeperesa Iosepine, ua lawe mai au i ke kahua o ka maalo hou ana aku imua o na makamaku noka elima o ka manawa, a waiho aku i ka moolelo piha e hoomaka ana mai ka halealii mai o Diana, ka huakai iloko oPerusia, ke kahua kaua o Auseturika, ka huakai...

"Ma kekahi ano hoi o ka olelo ae a me ka manaolana,"wahi a Lenoa i pane aku ai ia Konela Lenoa,"Ua makemake nui au maluna oe o na mea a pau ke loaa ole kekahi kue pilikino iau mai a oe mai, e noho au iloke o keia puali a hiki i kuu wa e lilo ai i Konela ma kou kulana!" "Lapuwale oe e kena wahi koa,"wahi a Konela Lenoa i pane mai ai. "Mahea iho la oe i manao ai e ku au ma kou kulana" "E kau aku oe maluna o ke kulana kiekie me ka hookohu o ka Ilamuku o ke kahua kaua." U...

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Ke Kamalii Wahineo Huilua a Me Kamapuaa (Princess Huilua and Kamapuaa)

By: May Parker

Na Kamalei—He Papahana Ho‘ona‘auao Kamali‘i ia no loko mai o kekahi hui ku i ka ‘auhau ‘ole no ka ‘oiwi Hawai‘i. Aia kekahi i loko o keia ‘ahahui he polokalamu ho‘ona‘auao makua/kamali‘i no ka lawelawe ‘ana i na ‘ohana o Ko‘olauloa ma ka mokupuni o O‘ahu. Me ke kokua kala ‘ana o ka Administration for Native Americans no ka pahana Na Kama o Ko‘olauLoa, ha‘awi keia ‘ahahui i na ‘ohana i mau lawelawe ‘ohana a me na ha‘awina ho‘ona‘auao ho‘i no ka ulu maika‘i ‘ana o...

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Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

By: Julie Stewart Williams

This book is one of a series originally written by faculty in a Kamehameha reading program. The books were designed to increase students' reading skills and their knowledge of Hawaiian history and culture by focusing on topics such as the Hawaiian monarchy. Some of these books have been translated from their original English into Hawaiian through the efforts of the staff of the Kamehameha Schools Hawaiian Studies Institute. We are pleased at the reception both the Engl...

"Her love for the young was great, and it was a pretty sight to see her surrounded by a group of children to whose pleasure she was ministering." Perhaps no other single sentence portrays Pauahi so accurately and so completely as this remembrance of her, published at the time of her death. It captures the essence of the princess and her legacy: love, children, service. What a beautiful experience to have been in the company of the princess and to have known her in pers...

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Pono E Loa'A Ke Kokua Ia'U

By: Ke'Alohi M. Reppun

Kako’o a paipai ka Hale Kuamo’o-Kikowaena ‘Olelo Hawai’i i ka ho’okumu ‘ana i ka ‘olelo Hawai’i, ‘o ia ka ‘olelo kaiapuni o na kula, o ke aupuni, o na ‘oihana like ‘ole, i lohe ‘ia mai ho’i ka ‘olelo Hawai’i mai ‘o a ‘o o Hawai’i Pae ‘Aina. Na ka Hale Kuamo’o e ho’omohala i na ha’awina e pono ai ka holomua o ka ‘olelo Hawai’i ma na ‘ano po’aiapili like ‘ole e like ho’i me ka ha’awina ‘olelo Hawai’i no na kula ‘olelo Hawai’i, na papahana kako’o kumu, ka nupepa ‘o Na Maka ...

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The Polynesian Family System in Ka'U, Hawai'I

By: E. S. Craighill Handy

The island of hawaii dominated the culture of the northernmost of the polynesian groups, even before the high chief kamehameha conquered the other islands and formed a united kingdom in the first decade of the nineteenth century. This truly great warrior, diplomat and ruler was born in kohala, but was reared, trained and toughened for his mission in ka-u, the southern and most rugged district of hawaii, where his mother, the high chieftainess kekui-a-poiwa, isolated hers...

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Place Names of Hawaii - Hawaii Dictionary

By: Mary Kawena Pukui

In this book the authors endeavor to provide the people of the State of Hawaii with a glossary of important place names in the State, including names of valleys, streams, mountains, land sections, surfing areas, towns, villages, and Honolulu streets and buildings. The first edition of Place Names of Hawaii contained only 1,125 entries. The coverage is expanded in the present edition to include about 4,000 entries, including names in English. Individual entries have been...

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