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The Pilot, Volume 2

By: James Fenimore Cooper

As Griffith and his compantions rushed from the offices of St. Ruth, into the open air, they encountered no one to intercept their flight, or communicate the alarm. Warned by the experience of the earlier part of the same night, they avoided the points where they knew the sentinels were posted, though fully prepared to bear down all resistance, and were soon beyond the probability of immediate detection. They proceded, for the distance of half a mile, with rapid strides, and with the stern and sullen silence of men who expected to encounter immediate danger, resolved to breast it with desperate resolution; but, as they plunged into a copse, that clustered around the ruin which has already been mentioned, they lessened their exertions to a more deliberate pace; and a short but guarded dialogue ensued....

· CHAPTER I. · CHAPTER II. · CHAPTER III. · CHAPTER IV. · CHAPTER V. · CHAPTER VI. · CHAPTER VII. · CHAPTER VIII. · CHAPTER IX. · CHAPTER X. · CHAPTER XI. · CHAPTER XII. · CHAPTER XIII. · CHAPTER XIV. · CHAPTER XV. · CHAPTER XVI. · CHAPTER XVII....

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Cargo Anonymous

By: Kenneth Robeson

Excerpt: RENNY RENWICK had felt uneasy all day. He had narrowed it down in his own mind to one of two possible causes. The first was the London fog. He disliked fogs unreasonably. Today?s was a stinker; it made you feel as if eels were crawling all over you. The second probability, which Renny Renwick thought was more likely, was that he was being followed. However, he hadn't been able to prove this to himself. He hadn't caught anybody hanging around on his trail?exactly....

Table of Contents: CARGO UNKNOWN, 1 -- A Doc Savage Adventure by Kenneth Robeson, 1 -- Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter II, 7 -- Chapter III, 13 -- Chapter IV, 18 -- Chapter V, 24 -- Chapter VI, 29 -- Chapter VII, 36 -- Chapter VIII, 40 -- Chapter IX, 42 -- Chapter X, 48 -- Chapter XI, 55 -- Chapter XII, 59 -- Chapter XIII, 64 -- Chapter XIV, 67 -- Chapter XV, 72...

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Slips of Speech

By: John H. Bechtel

Excerpt: Homer, in all probability, knew no rules of rhetoric, and was not tortured with the consideration of grammatical construction, and yet his verse will endure through time. If everybody possessed the genius of Homer, rules and cautions in writing would be unnecessary....

Table of Contents: Slips of Speech, 1 -- John H. Bechtel, 1 -- Introduction, 1 -- SLIPS OF SPEECH, 2 -- Chapter I. Taste, 2 -- Chapter II. Choice of Words, 5 -- Chapter III. Contractions, 54 -- Chapter IV. Possessive Case, 56 -- Chapter V. Pronouns, 58 -- Chapter VI. Number, 64 -- Chapter VII. Adverbs, 68 -- Chapter VIII. Conjunctions, 71 -- Chapter IX. Correlatives, 73 -- Chapter X. The Infinitive, 75 -- Chapter XI. Participles, 76 -- Chapter XII. Prepositions, 78 -- Chapter XIII. The Article, 81 -- Chapter XIV. Redundancy, 82 -- Chapter XV. Two Negatives, 86 -- Chapter XVI. Accordance of Verb with Subject, 88...

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The Metal Monster

By: A. E. Merritt

Before the narrative which follows was placed in my hands, I had never seen Dr. Walter T. Goodwin, its author. When the manuscript revealing his adventures among the pre-historic ruins of the Nan-Matal in the Carolines (The Moon Pool) had been given me by the International Association of Science for editing and revision to meet the requirements of a popular presentation, Dr. Goodwin had left America. He had explained that he was still too shaken, too depressed, to be able to recall experiences that must inevitably carry with them freshened memories of those whom he loved so well and from whom, he felt, he was separated in all probability forever....

· PROLOGUE · CHAPTER I. VALLEY OF THE BLUE POPPIES · CHAPTER II. THE SIGIL ON THE ROCKS · CHAPTER III. RUTH VENTNOR · CHAPTER IV. METAL WITH A BRAIN · CHAPTER V. THE SMITING THING · CHAPTER VI. NORHALA OF THE LIGHTNINGS · CHAPTER VII. THE SHAPES IN THE MIST · CHAPTER VIII. THE DRUMS OF THUNDER · CHAPTER IX. THE PORTAL OF FLAME · CHAPTER X. WITCH! GIVE BACK MY SISTER · CHAPTER XI. THE METAL EMPEROR · CHAPTER XII. I WILL GIVE YOU PEACE · CHAPTER XIII. VOICE FROM THE VOID · CHAPTER XIV. FREE! BUT A MONSTER! · CHAPTER XV. THE HOUSE OF NORHALA · CHAPTER XVI. CONSCIOUS METAL! · CHAPTER XVII. YURUK · CHAPTER XVIII. INTO THE PIT · CHAPTER XIX. THE CITY THAT WAS ALIVE · CHAPTER XX. VAMPIRES OF THE SUN · CHAPTER XXI. PHANTASMAGORIA METALLIOUE. · CHAPTER XXII. THE ENSORCELLED CHAMBER · CHAPTER XXIII. THE TREACHERY OF YURUK · CHAPTER XXIV. RUSZARK · CHAPTER XXV. CHERKIS · CHAPTER XXVI. THE VENGEANCE OF NORHALA · CHAPTER XXVII. THE DRUMS OF DESTINY · CHAPTER XXVIII. THE FRENZY OF RUTH · CHAPTER XXIX. THE PASSING OF NORHALA · CHAPTER XXX. BURNED OUT · CHAPTER XXXI. SLAG!...

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Unge Hemming Karaktärstudier

By: Mikael Lybeck

Description: The book bears the stamp of reality and probability, which, gaining momentum through the numerous finely made ​​observations which everywhere are interspersed. - - It contains several batches of true poetic beauty , who is already in itself d...

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Anne Bradstreet and Her Time

By: Helen Campbell

Introduction: Grave doubts at times arise in the critical mind as to whether America has had any famous women. We are reproached with the fact, that in spite of some two hundred years of existence, we have, as yet, developed no genius in any degree comparable to that of George Eliot and George Sand in the present, or a dozen other as familiar names of the past. One at least of our prominent literary journals has formulated this reproach, and is even sceptical as to the probability of any future of this nature for American women. What the conditions have been which hindered and hampered such development, will find full place in the story of the one woman who, in the midst of obstacles that might easily have daunted a far stouter soul, spoke such words as her limitations allowed. Anne Bradstreet, as a name standing alone, and represented only by a volume of moral reflections and the often stilted and unnatural verse of the period, would perhaps, hardly claim a place in formal biography....

Table of Contents: Anne Bradstreet and Her Time, 1 -- Helen Campbell, 1 -- Introduction, 1 -- Chapter I. THE OLD HOME, 2 -- Chapter II. UPHEAVALS, 11 -- Chapter III. THE VOYAGE, 17 -- Chapter IV. BEGINNINGS, 22 -- Chapter V. OLD FRIENDS AND NEW, 29 -- Chapter VI. A THEOLOGICAL TRAGEDY, 46 -- Chapter VII. COLONIAL LITERARY DEVELOPMENT IN THE SEVENTEENTH -- CENTURY, 54 -- Chapter VIII. SOME PHASES OF EARLY COLONIAL LIFE, 65 -- Chapter IX. ANDOVER, 72 -- Chapter X. VILLAGE LIFE IN 1650, 80 -- Chapter XI. A FIRST EDITION, 91 -- Chapter XII. MISCELLANEOUS POEMS, 109 -- Chapter XIII. CHANCES AND CHANGES, 121 -- Chapter XIV. THE LEGACY, 134 -- Chapter XV. THE PURITAN REIGN OF TERROR, 145 -- Chapter XVI. HOME AND ABROAD, 151 -- Chapter XVII. THE END, 158 -- INDEX, 169...

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Peter Simple

By: Frederick Marryat

If I cannot narrate a life of adventurous and daring exploits, fortunately I have no heavy crimes to confess: and, if I do not rise in the estimation of the reader for acts of gallantry and devotion in my country's cause, at least I may claim the merit of zealous and persevering continuance in my vocation. We are all of us variously gifted from Above, and he who is content to walk, instead of to run, on his allotted path through life, although he may not so rapidly attain the goal, has the advantage of not being out of breath upon his arrival. As well as I can recollect and analyse my early propensities, I think that, had I been permitted to select my own profession, I should in all probability have bound myself apprentice to a tailor; for I always envied the comfortable seat which they appeared to enjoy upon the shopboard, and their elevated position, which enabled them to look down upon the constant succession of the idle or the busy, who passed in review before them in the main street of the country town, near to which I passed the first fourteen years of my existence....

· Chapter I. · Chapter II. · Chapter III. · Chapter IV. · Chapter V. · Chapter VI. · Chapter VII. · Chapter VIII. · Chapter IX. · Chapter X. · Chapter XI. · Chapter XII. · Chapter XIII. · Chapter XIV. · Chapter XV. · Chapter XVI. · Chapter XVII. · Chapter XVIII. · Chapter XIX. · Chapter XX. · Chapter XXI. · Chapter XXII. · Chapter XXIII. · Chapter XXIV. · Chapter XXV. · Chapter XXVI. · Chapter XXVII. · Chapter XXVIII. · Chapter XXIX. · Chapter XXX. · Chapter XXXI. · Chapter XXXII. · Chapter XXXIII. · Chapter XXXIV. · Chapter XXXV....

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Slips of Speech

By: John H. Bechtel

Homer, in all probability, knew no rules of rhetoric, and was not tortured with the consideration of grammatical construction, and yet his verse will endure through time. If everybody possessed the genius of Homer, rules and cautions in writing would be unnecessary. To-day all men speak, and most men write, but it is observed that those who most closely follow Homer's method of writing without rules are most unlike Homer in the results. The ancient bard was a law unto himself; we need rules for our guidance. Rules of writing are the outgrowth of the study of the characteristics and qualities of style which distinguish the best writers from those of inferior skill and ability. Grammarians and rhetoricians, according to their several lines of investigation, set forth the laws and principles governing speech, and formulate rules whereby we may follow the true, and avoid the false....

· INTRODUCTION · SLIPS OF SPEECH · CHAPTER I. Taste · CHAPTER II. Choice of Words · CHAPTER III. Contractions · CHAPTER IV. Possessive Case · CHAPTER V. Pronouns · CHAPTER VI. Number · CHAPTER VII. Adverbs · CHAPTER VIII. Conjunctions · CHAPTER IX. Correlatives · CHAPTER X. The Infinitive · CHAPTER XI. Participles · CHAPTER XII. Prepositions · CHAPTER XIII. The Article · CHAPTER XIV. Redundancy · CHAPTER XV. Two Negatives · CHAPTER XVI. Accordance of Verb with Subject...

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Loulou

By: Thomas Mann

Excerpt: THERE are some marriages, and not even an imagination fed up on novels can explain how they came about. They must simply be accepted, the way we accept a juxtaposition of opposing qualities on the stage, such as old?and?stupid over against beautiful?and?full?of?life which are presupposed, taken for granted as the basis for erecting a farce with the proper mathematics. As to the wife of Herr Jacoby, attorney at law, she was young and lovely, an unusually prepossessing woman. Let us say about thirty years ago, she had been baptized Anna Margaret Rose Amelia, but since then she was called nothing but Amra, from her four initials. This had an exotic twang which was peculiarly suited to her character. For although the darkness of her strong soft hair, which she wore parted in the middle and brushed on either side away from her low forehead, was only the brownness of a chestnut kernel, still her skin was southern in its subdued flat olive. And this skin was stretched over curves which likewise seemed ripened by a southern sun, recalling a sultana with their indolent and vegetative luxuriance. This impression, which was heightened...

Table of Contents: Lou and Liz, 1 -- George Gissing, 1 -- Lou and Liz -- i

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The English Rogue, Part 4

By: Richard Head

We see there is a necessity for our travailing in the common road, or High-way of Prefacing; as if the Reader could neither receive nor digest the Pabulum mentis, or fatten by the mental nourishment, without a preparatory. And yet we think it savors neither of civility, nor good manners to fall on without saying something of a grace; but we do not love that it should be so tedious, as to take away your stomack from the meat, and therefore that we may not be condemned for that prolixity we mislike in others, we shall briefly tell you how little we value the favour of such Readers, who take a pride to blast the wits of others, imagining thereby to augment the reputation of their own: What unexpected success we have obtained in the publication of the former parts, will keep us from despairing, that in this we shall be less fortunate than in the other. But although our Books have been generally received with great applause, and read with much delight and satisfaction, as home and abroad, (having travailed many thousand miles) yet we do not imagine them to be without their Errata's, for which they have suffer'd very harsh correction; thi...

· THE PREFACE. · THE ENGLISH ROGUE: Continued in the Life of Meriton Latroon, AND OTHER EXTRAVAGANTS. PART IV. · CHAP. I. · CHAP. II. · CHAP. III. · CHAP. IV. · CHAP. V. · CHAP. VI. · CHAP. VII. · CHAP. VIII. · CHAP. IX. · CHAP. X. · CHAP. XI. · CHAP. XII. · CHAP. XIII. · CHAP. XIV. · CHAP. XV. · CHAP. XVI. · CHAP. XVII. · CHAP. XVIII. · CHAP. XIX. · CHAP. XX. · CHAP. XXI. · CHAP. XXII. · CHAP. XXIII. · CHAP. XXIV....

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The English Rogue, Part 4

By: Richard Head

The Preface: Gentlemen, We see there is a necessity for our travailing in the common road, or High?way of Prefacing; as if the Reader could neither receive nor digest the Pabulum mentis, or fatten by the mental nourishment, without a preparatory. And yet we think it savors neither of civility, nor good manners to fall on without saying something of a grace; but we do not love that it should be so tedious, as to take away your stomack from the meat, and therefore that we may not be condemned for that prolixity we mislike in others, we shall briefly tell you how little we value the favour of such Readers, who take a pride to blast the wits of others, imagining thereby to augment the reputation of their own: What unexpected success we have obtained in the publication of the former parts, will keep us from despairing, that in this we shall be less fortunate than in the other. But although our Books have been generally received with great applause, and read with much delight and satisfaction, as home and abroad, (having travailed many thousand miles) yet we do not imagine them to be without their Errata?s, for which they have suffer?d ve...

Table of Contents: The English Rogue, Part 4, 1 -- Richard Head, 1 -- THE Preface, 2 -- THE ENGLISH ROGUE: Continued in the Life of Meriton Latroon, AND OTHER EXTRAVAGANTS. PART Chapter I, 3 -- Chapter II, 10 -- [Our Mulletteer was very well rewarded, ], 11 -- The Speech of a Notoriously?wicked Woman at her Execution, 13 -- [This Speech of the dying person, ], 14 -- Chapter III, 15 -- Chapter IV, 21 -- Chapter V, 25 -- Chapter VI, 28 -- Chapter VII, 34 -- Chapter VIII, 39 -- Chapter IX, 42 -- Chapter X, 47 -- Chapter XI, 53 -- [One Broken Tradesman. 2 Jilts, ], 53 -- Broken?Tradesman, 53 -- Jilts, 55 -- Pretended (poor) Captain, 56 -- Counterfeit Libertine Minister, 58 -- A Soldier of Fortune, 60 -- The New?Exchange?Girl, 64 -- Two Button?makers, 64 -- An Orange?Wench, 66 -- Common Prostitutes, 68 -- [Our Master having intelligence, ], 68 -- Chapter XII, 69 -- Chapter XIII, 72 -- Chapter XIV, 74 -- Chapter XV, 77 -- Chapter XVI, 80 -- Chapter XVII, 81 -- Chapter XVIII, 82 -- Chapter XIX, 86 -- Chapter XX, 92 -- Chapter XXI, 97 -- An Encomium on Canary, 103 -- Chapter XXII, 103 -- Chapter XXIII, 109 -- Chapter XXIV, 110...

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An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume Ii

By: John Locke

Excerpt: Chapter 1. OF WORDS OR LANGUAGE IN GENERAL. 1. Man fitted to form articulated Sounds. God, having designed man for a sociable creature, made him not only with an inclination, and under a necessity to have fellowship with those of his own kind, but furnished him also with language, which was to be the great instrument and common tie of society. Man, therefore, had by nature his organs so fashioned, as to be fit to frame articulate sounds, which we call words. But this was not enough to produce language; for parrots, and several other birds, will be taught to make articulate sounds distinct enough, which yet by no means are capable of language....

Table of Contents: An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume II, 1 -- John Locke, 1 -- BOOK III. OF WORDS, 2 -- Chapter I. OF WORDS OR LANGUAGE IN GENERAL, 2 -- Chapter II. OF THE SIGNIFICATION OF WORDS, 3 -- Chapter III. OF GENERAL TERMS, 5 -- Chapter IV. OF THE NAMES OF SIMPLE IDEAS, 12 -- Chapter V. OF THE NAMES OF MIXED MODES AND RELATIONS, 16 -- Chapter VI. OF THE NAMES OF SUBSTANCES, 22 -- Chapter VII. OF PARTICLES, 39 -- Chapter VIII. OF ABSTRAct AND CONCRETE TERMS, 40 -- Chapter IX. OF THE IMPERFECTION OF WORDS, 41 -- Chapter X. OF THE ABUSE OF WORDS, 49 -- Chapter XI. OF THE REMEDIES OF THE FOREGOING IMPERFECTIONS AND -- ABUSES OF WORDS, 59 -- BOOK IV. OF KNOWLEDGE AND PROBABILITY SYNOPSIS OF THE FOURTH BOOK, 68 -- Chapter I. OF KNOWLEDGE IN GENERAL, 68 -- Chapter II. OF THE DEGREES OF OUR KNOWLEDGE, 71 -- Chapter III. OF THE EXTENT OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE, 76 -- Chapter IV. OF THE REALITY OF KNOWLEDGE, 88 -- Chapter V. OF TRUTH IN GENERAL, 94 -- Chapter VI. OF UNIVERSAL PROPOSITIONS: THEIR TRUTH AND CERTAINTY, 97 -- Chapter VII. OF MAXIMS, 103 -- Chapter VIII. OF TRIFLING PROPOSITIONS, 112 -- Chapter IX. OF OUR THREEFOLD...

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Book of Lieh-Tzu , The

By: Lieh-Tzu ; Liezi

Although Lieh Tzu's work has evidently passed through the hands of many editors and gathered numerous accretions, there remains a considerable nucleus which in all probability was committed to writing by Lieh Tzu's immediate disciples, and is therefore older than the genuine parts of Chuang Tzu. There are some obvious analogies between the two authors, and indeed a certain amount of matter common to both; but on the whole Lieh Tzu's book bears an unmistakable impress of its own. The geniality of its tone contrasts with the somewhat hard brilliancy of Chuang Tzu, and a certain kindly sympathy with the aged, the poor and the humble of this life, not excluding the brute creation, makes itself felt throughout. - From Lionel Giles Introduction...

History, Literature

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Loulou

By: Thomas Mann

As to the wife of Herr Jacoby, attorney at law, she was young and lovely, an unusually prepossessing woman. Let us say about thirty years ago, she had been baptized Anna Margaret Rose Amelia, but since then she was called nothing but Amra, from her four initials. This had an exotic twang which was peculiarly suited to her character. For although the darkness of her strong soft hair, which she wore parted in the middle and brushed on either side away from her low forehead, was only the brownness of a chestnut kernel, still her skin was southern in its subdued flat olive. And this skin was stretched over curves which likewise seemed ripened by a southern sun, recalling a sultana with their indolent and vegetative luxuriance. This impression, which was heightened by every one of her covetously sluggish motions, corresponded with the fact that in all probability her head was less master than her heart. To know that, you had only to be looked at out of her stupid brown eyes, while she wrinkled her almost astonishingly low forehead in a way of her own. But she was not too simple to realize this herself. She avoided exposing herself by the...

· I · II · III · IV · V

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The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Mar/Apr 1662/63

By: Mynors Bright

March 1st (Lord's day). Up and walked to White Hall, to the Chappell, where preached one Dr. Lewes, said heretofore to have been a great witt; but he read his sermon every word, and that so brokenly and so low, that nobody could hear at any distance, nor I anything worth hearing that sat near. But, which was strange, he forgot to make any prayer before sermon, which all wonder at, but they impute it to his forgetfulness. After sermon a very fine anthem; so I up into the house among the courtiers, seeing the fine ladies, and, above all, my Lady Castlemaine, who is above all, that only she I can observe for true beauty. The King and Queen being set to dinner I went to Mr. Fox's, and there dined with him. Much genteel company, and, among other things, I hear for certain that peace is concluded between the King of France and the Pope; and also I heard the reasons given by our Parliament yesterday to the King why they dissent from him in matter of Indulgence, which are very good quite through, and which I was glad to hear. Thence to my Lord Sandwich, who continues with a great cold, locked up; and, being alone, we fell into discourse of ...

Na

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Lizzy Glenn

By: T. S. Arthur

NEEDLE-WORK, at best, yields but a small return. Yet how many thousands have no other resource in life, no other barrier thrown up between them and starvation! The manly stay upon which a woman has leaned suddenly fails, and she finds self-support an imperative necessity; yet she has no skill, no strength, no developed resources. In all probability she is a mother. In this case she must not only stand alone, but sustain her helpless children. Since her earliest recollection, others have ministered to her wants and pleasures. From a father's hand, childhood and youth received their countless natural blessings; and brother or husband, in later years, has stood between her and the rough winds of a stormy world. All at once, like a bird reared, from a fledgling, in its cage, and then turned (sic) lose in dreary winter time, she finds herself in the world, unskilled in its ways, yet required to earn her bread or perish....

· CHAPTER I. LIZZY GLENN--MRS. GASTON AND HER SICK CHILD. · CHAPTER II. HOW A NEEDLEWOMAN LIVES. · CHAPTER III. DEATH OF MRS. GASTON'S CHILD.--A MOTHER'S ANGUISH. · CHAPTER IV. LIZZY GLENN AROUSES THE INTEREST OF A STRANGER. · CHAPTER V. SOME OF THE TROUBLES OF A NEEDLEWOMAN.--A FRIEND IN NEED. · CHAPTER V. PERKINS' NARRATIVE. · CHAPTER VII. HENRY GASTON LEAVES HOME WITH SHARP. · CHAPTER VIII. HENRY GASTON'S TREATMENT BY SHARP. · CHAPTER IX. LIZZY GLENN FINDS IN MRS. GASTON AN OLD FRIEND. · CHAPTER X. LIZZY GLENN'S NARRATIVE TO MRS. GASTON. · CHAPTER XI. PERKINS ANXIOUSLY SEEKS LIZZY GLENN. · CHAPTER XII. PERKINS FINDS IN LIZZY GLENN HIS LONG LOST EUGENIA. · THE FATHER'S DREAM. · I'LL SEE ABOUT IT. · HUMAN LIFE. · THE SUM OF TRIFLES: OR, A PENNY SAVED IS A PENNY GAINED....

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The Metal Monster

By: A. E. Merritt

Excerpt: When the manuscript revealing his adventures among the pre?historic ruins of the Nan?Matal in the Carolines (The Moon Pool) had been given me by the International Association of Science for editing and revision to meet the requirements of a popular presentation, Dr. Goodwin had left America. He had explained that he was still too shaken, too depressed, to be able to recall experiences that must inevitably carry with them freshened memories of those whom he loved so well and from whom, he felt, he was separated in all probability forever. I had understood that he had gone to some remote part of Asia to pursue certain botanical studies, and it was therefore with the liveliest surprise and interest that I received a summons from the President of the Association to meet Dr. Goodwin at a designated place and hour....

Table of Contents: The Metal Monster, 1 -- A. Merritt, 1 -- PROLOGUE, 1 -- Chapter I. VALLEY OF THE BLUE POPPIES, 3 -- Chapter II. THE SIGIL ON THE ROCKS, 8 -- Chapter III. RUTH VENTNOR, 11 -- Chapter IV. METAL WITH A BRAIN, 18 -- Chapter V. THE SMITING THING, 23 -- Chapter VI. NORHALA OF THE LIGHTNINGS, 29 -- Chapter VII. THE SHAPES IN THE MIST, 36 -- Chapter VIII. THE DRUMS OF THUNDER, 39 -- Chapter IX. THE PORTAL OF FLAME, 44 -- Chapter X. WITCH! GIVE BACK MY SISTER, 48 -- Chapter XI. THE METAL EMPEROR, 52 -- Chapter XII. I WILL GIVE YOU PEACE, 58 -- Chapter XIII. VOICE FROM THE VOID, 61 -- Chapter XIV. FREE! BUT A MONSTER!, 64 -- Chapter XV. THE HOUSE OF NORHALA, 67 -- Chapter XVI. CONSCIOUS METAL!, 72 -- Chapter XVII. YURUK, 75 -- Chapter XVIII. INTO THE PIT, 78 -- Chapter XIX. THE CITY THAT WAS ALIVE, 86 -- Chapter XX. VAMPIRES OF THE SUN, 92 -- Chapter XXI. PHANTASMAGORIA METALLIOUE, 102 -- Chapter XXII. THE ENSORCELLED CHAMBER, 108 -- Chapter XXIII. THE TREACHERY OF YURUK, 113 -- Chapter XXIV. RUSZARK, 122 -- Chapter XXV. CHERKIS, 127 -- Chapter XXVI. THE VENGEANCE OF NORHALA, 131 -- Chapter XXVII. THE DRUMS OF DESTINY, 136 ...

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The Pilot, Volume 2

By: James Fenimore Cooper

Excerpt: Chapter 1. Our trumpet called you to this gentle parle King John As Griffith and his compantions rushed from the offices of St. Ruth, into the open air, they encountered no one to intercept their flight, or communicate the alarm. Warned by the experience of the earlier part of the same night, they avoided the points where they knew the sentinels were posted, though fully prepared to bear down all resistance, and were soon beyond the probability of immediate detection. They proceded, for the distance of half a mile, with rapid strides, and with the stern and sullen silence of men who expected to encounter immediate danger, resolved to breast it with desperate resolution; but, as they plunged into a copse, that clustered around the ruin which has already been mentioned, they lessened their exertions to a more deliberate pace; and a short but guarded dialogue ensued....

Table of Contents: The Pilot, volume 2, 1 -- James Fenimore Cooper, 1 -- Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter II, 10 -- Chapter III, 15 -- Chapter IV, 19 -- Chapter V, 26 -- Chapter VI, 34 -- Chapter VII, 44 -- Chapter VIII, 50 -- Chapter IX, 55 -- Chapter X, 62 -- Chapter XI, 69 -- Chapter XII, 77 -- Chapter XIII, 82 -- Chapter XIV, 91 -- Chapter XV, 98 -- Chapter XVI, 109 -- Chapter XVII, 116...

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The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction Series

By: Jonathan Ingram

Excerpt: THE FORTUNE PLAYHOUSE. [Illustration: The Fortune Playhouse.] The Engraving represents one of the playhouses of Shakspeare?s time, as the premises appeared a few years since. This theatre was in Golden Lane, Barbican, and was built by that celebrated and benevolent actor Edward Alleyn, the pious founder of Dulwich College, in 1599. It was burnt in 1624, but rebuilt in 1629. A story is told of a large treasure being found in digging for the foundation, and it is probable that the whole sum fell to Alleyn. Upon equal probability, is the derivation of the name ?The Fortune.? The theatre was a spacious brick building, and exhibited the royal arms in plaster on its front. These are retained in the Engraving; where the disposal of the lower part on the building into shops, &c. is a sorry picture of the ?base purposes? to which a temple of the Drama has been converted....

Table of Contents: The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, 1 -- Vol. 13, Issue 371, May 23, 1829, 1 -- THE FORTUNE PLAYHOUSE, 1 -- FINE ARTS, 2 -- THE SKETCH?BOOK, 7 -- RESTROSPECTIVE GLEANINGS, 9 -- THE NOVELIST, 10 -- THE SELECTOR, AND LITERARY NOTICES OF NEW WORKS, 12 -- THE NATURALIST, 15 -- THE ANECDOTE GALLERY, 17 -- THE GATHERER, 19...

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Treatise Of Human Nature, Volume 1, A

By: David Hume

This book, published in two volumes called books by the author, is a treatment of everything from the origin of our ideas to how they are to be divided. It includes important statements of Scepticism and Hume's experimental method. Part 1 deals with the nature of ideas. Part 2 deals with the ideas of space and time. Part 3 deals with knowledge and probability. Part 4 deals with skeptical and other systems of philosophy, including a discussion of the soul and personal identity. This is a recording of Volume I (or Book 1). Volume II (which contains Books 2 and 3) is in production at the moment....

Philosophy

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