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Hardcover

An example of the modern hardcover book with dust jacket: The first edition of William Faulkner's 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury

A hardcover, hardback, or hardbound book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.

Hardcover books are often printed on

  • How to make a simple Hardcover book

External links

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/27/books/e-books-accelerate-paperback-publishers-release-dates.html?_r=0
  4. ^ http://www.pitt.edu/~kloman/early.html

References

See also

Hardcovers typically consist of a page block, two boards, and a cloth or heavy paper covering. The pages are sewn together and glued onto a flexible spine between the boards, and it too is covered by the cloth. A paper wrapper, or dust jacket, is usually put over the binding, folding over each horizontal end of the boards. On the folded part, or flap, over the front cover is generally a blurb, or a summary of the book. The back flap is where the biography of the author can be found. Reviews are often placed on the back of the jacket.

Old hardcover books at the Merton College library.

Typical structure

Hardcover books are usually sold at higher prices than comparable paperbacks. Books for the general public are usually printed in hardback only for authors who are expected to be successful; however, many academic books are often only published in hardcover editions.

Prices

If brisk sales are anticipated, a hardcover edition of a book is typically released first, followed by a "trade" paperback edition (same format as hardcover) the next year. Some publishers publish paperback originals if slow hardback sales are anticipated. For very popular books these sales cycles may be extended, and followed by a mass market paperback edition typeset in a more compact size and printed on shallower, less hardy paper. This is intended to, in part, prolong the life of the immediate buying boom that occurs for some best sellers: After the attention to the book has subsided, a lower-cost version in the paperback, is released to sell further copies. In the past the release of a paperback edition was one year after the hardback, but by the early twenty-first century paperbacks were released six months after the hardback by some publishers.[3] It is very unusual for a book that was first published in paperback to be followed by a hardback. An example is the novel The Judgment of Paris by Gore Vidal, which had its revised edition of 1961 first published in paperback, and later in hardcover.[4]

Marketing

Contents

  • Marketing 1
  • Prices 2
  • Typical structure 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

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