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Mona Lisa (film)

Mona Lisa
original film poster
Directed by Neil Jordan
Produced by Stephen Woolley
Written by Neil Jordan
David Leland
Starring
Music by Michael Kamen
Genesis (song "In Too Deep")
Cinematography Roger Pratt
Edited by Lesley Walker
Production
company
Distributed by Island Pictures
Release dates
  • 13 June 1986 (1986-06-13)
Running time
104 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Budget £2 million[1]

Mona Lisa is a 1986 British neo-noir mystery drama about an ex-convict who becomes entangled in the dangerous life of a high-class call girl. The film was written by Neil Jordan and David Leland, and directed by Jordan. It was produced by HandMade Films and stars Bob Hoskins, Cathy Tyson and Michael Caine.

The film was nominated for multiple awards, and Bob Hoskins was nominated for several awards for his performance (including the Academy Award for Best Actor), winning the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role.

Contents

  • Plot 1
  • Cast 2
  • Reaction 3
  • Awards and nominations 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Plot

George (Hoskins), recently released from prison, is given a job as the driver for a high-class prostitute named Simone (Tyson) by his former boss, Denny Mortwell (Caine). As George and Simone find out more about each other, they form a friendship. Central to this theme is Mortwell's wish for George to find out as much as he can about one of Simone's 'regulars', a wealthy businessman. George helps Simone in her quest to find Cathy (Hardie), an abused friend from her past. This leads to a violent resolution in the seedy underworld.

Cast

Reaction

The film received positive critical reaction when released in 1986. Film critic Roger Ebert wrote of the two main characters "The relationship of their characters in the film is interesting, because both people, for personal reasons, have developed a style that doesn't reveal very much."[2] However, Vincent Canby, writing for the New York Times, dismissed the film as "classy kitsch."[3] Halliwell's Film Guide argued "only this actor could make a hit of this unsavoury yarn, with its highlights of sex and violence. But he did."[4]

Bob Hoskins was praised for his performance and was awarded the Golden Globe Award, BAFTA Award, Prix d'interprétation masculine at the Cannes Film Festival, and other awards. Despite this heavy acclaim, he lost the Academy Award for Best Actor to Paul Newman in The Color of Money; a sequel to The Hustler.

Awards and nominations

Year Award Result Recipient
1986 Academy Award for Best Actor Nominated Bob Hoskins
1986 BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role Won Bob Hoskins
1986 BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role Nominated Cathy Tyson
1986 Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Won Bob Hoskins
1986 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture Nominated Cathy Tyson
1986 Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
1986 Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
1986 Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
1986 London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
Tied with William HurtKiss of the Spider Woman
1986 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
1986 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress Won Cathy Tyson
1986 National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
1986 New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins
1986 Valladolid International Film Festival for Best Actor Won Bob Hoskins

References

  1. ^ Alexander Walker, Icons in the Fire: The Rise and Fall of Practically Everyone in the British Film Industry 1984–2000, Orion Books, 2005 p54
  2. ^ Ebert, Roger (2 July 1986) "Mona Lisa"Review: Chicago Sun-Times (Retrieved: 12 March 2010)
  3. ^ Canby, Vincent (13 July 1986) (1986)"Mona Lisa"Movie Review: . The New York Times (Retrieved: 12 March 2010)
  4. ^ Halliwell's Film Guide, 13th edition. ISBN 978-0-00-638868-5.

External links

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