World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Sidney Blackmer

Sidney Blackmer
Promotional Photo
Born Sidney Alderman Blackmer
(1895-07-13)July 13, 1895
Salisbury, North Carolina, U.S.
Died October 6, 1973(1973-10-06) (aged 78)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Other names S.A. Blackmer
Occupation Actor
Years active 1914–1971
Spouse(s) Lenore Ulric
(m.1928–1939; divorced)
Suzanne Kaaren
(m.1943–1973; his death)
2 sons
Awards North Carolina Award, Fine Arts
Blackmer in the re-issue trailer for the 1934 film The Count of Monte Cristo

Sidney Alderman Blackmer (July 13, 1895 – October 6, 1973) was an American actor.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Personal life 2
  • Partial filmography 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Biography

Blackmer was born and raised in Salisbury, North Carolina, the son of Clara Deroulhac (née Alderman) and Walter Steele Blackmer.[1][2] He started off in an insurance and financial business but gave up on it. While working as a builder's laborer on a new building, he saw a Pearl White serial being filmed and immediately decided to go into acting. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[1] Blackmer went to New York hoping to act on the stage. While in the city, he took jobs and extra work at various film studios at the then motion picture capital, Fort Lee, New Jersey, including a bit part in the highly popular serial, The Perils of Pauline (1914).

He made his Broadway debut in 1917, but his career was interrupted by service in the U.S. military in World War I. After the war, he returned to the theatre and in 1929 returned to motion pictures and went on to be a major character actor in more than 120 films. He won the 1950 Tony Award for Best Actor (Drama) for his role in the Broadway play, Come Back, Little Sheba.

In film, Blackmer is remembered for his more than a dozen portrayals of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt, and for his role in the Academy Award-winning 1968 Roman Polanski film about urban New York witches, Rosemary's Baby, in which he played an over-solicitous neighbor.

In 1919, Blackmer played a major role in the strike that led to the formation of Actors' Equity Association.

A humanitarian, Blackmer served as the national vice president of the United States Muscular Dystrophy Association. He also helped start up the North Carolina School of the Arts.[3][4] In 1972, he was honored with the North Carolina Award in the Fine Arts category. It is the state of North Carolina's highest civilian award. On his passing in 1991, Blackmer was interred in the Chestnut Hill Cemetery in his hometown of Salisbury, North Carolina.

Personal life

Blackmer was married to actress Lenore Ulric from 1928–1939. His second wife was Suzanne Kaaren to whom he was married from 1943 to his death in 1973. He and Kaaren had two sons. They lived in the family home in Salisbury, North Carolina.

For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Sidney Blackmer has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1625 Vine Street.

Partial filmography

Blackmer also appeared in television roles, such as The Premature Burial episode of TV series Thriller, 1961. He is perhaps best-remembered as Presidential candidate William Lyons Selby in the Outer Limits episode The Hundred Days of the Dragon.

References

  1. ^ a b Scarvey, Katie (17 January 2010). "Blackmer a star of stage and screen". Salisbury Post. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  2. ^ http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=41578120
  3. ^ "Residence of W. S. Blackmer". Theo. Buerbaum's Salisbury. Rowan Public Library. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  4. ^ Scarvey, Katie (2 March 2012). "Blackmer home will likely be torn down soon". Salisbury Post. 

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from School eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.